Behind the Little Blue Pill: Debunking Myths About Viagra

It can be difficult to discuss erectile dysfunction, even with your doctor. It can be even more difficult to ask for help. And, thanks to the many myths about medications to treat the condition, you may think that the drawbacks of using drugs far outweigh the benefits. Dr. Floyd Seskin is and expert in treating erectile dysfunction and is well-acquainted with the pros and cons of ED medication, and can discuss them in the context of your specific situation. 

In spite of all the jokes, Viagra® and the generic forms of the erectile-dysfunction medication remain popular. Some 65% of ED prescriptions filled between December 1, 2018, and January 31, 2019, a two-month period, were for Viagra or the generic version. Here, we debunk some of the myths about the little blue pill so that you can make a more informed decision. 

Myth 1: You won’t have an erection for hours

The medical term for an erection that lasts for hours is priapism, and if you’re taking sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, under the supervision of Dr. Seskin, you won’t experience it. 

The myth about erections that wouldn’t go away came about because if you’re taking Viagra and also having penile injections to treat ED, you may develop priapism. It’s important to have guidance from a highly qualified medical professional like Dr. Seskin. 

Myth 2: You won’t go blind

Although it’s a myth that sildenafil damages your eyes, it’s true that it can change your vision. Certain chemicals in the drug can change how your eyes process light. Everything may develop a bluish tint for awhile. 

The good news is that the blue goes away. There’s no evidence that Viagra causes permanent damage to the eyes. 

Myth 3: Viagra is a libido stimulant

If you’ve lost interest in sex, sildenafil isn’t going to help. Many factors can contribute to low libido, including psychological factors, hormonal issues, stress, alcohol, some medications, and stress, among many others. Viagra won’t help with any of those things. 

In order for Viagra to work, you must be sexually stimulated. It won’t make you want to be sexually stimulated, though. 

Myth 4: It could cause heart problems

Originally, Viagra was developed to treat chest pain, or angina. In other words, it was first intended to be a heart medicine, not for harder erections. And, it does actually treat angina, but so do several other drugs that are more commonly prescribed. 

That’s where the danger arises: if you’re already taking a nitrate to treat angina, taking sildenafil also can cause your blood pressure to drop too low. Low blood pressure can increase your risk of having a heart attack. 

If you’re considering medication for ED, chances are you have lots of questions. Dr. Seskin is happy to answer them. Give us a call at 305-792-6905 between 8:30am and 5pm, Monday through Friday to schedule your appointment.

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